Wheat Disease trigger Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers in Canada found that excess body response and abnormal in some people with certain types of genes after eating food made from wheat, which triggers a person has type 1 diabetes.

Diabetes type 1 or called Insulin-Dependent Diabetes (IDDM) or diabetic dependent on insulin is more common in children than adults, is characterized by loss of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, causing insulin deficiency in the body.

Until now, type 1 diabetes can not be prevented. Diet and exercise can not reverse or prevent type 1 diabetes. Most people with type 1 diabetes have a health and a good weight when the disease began to suffer.

The cause of most of the loss of beta cells in type 1 diabetes is a mistake autoimunitas reaction that destroys pancreatic beta cells. Autoimunitas reaction can be triggered by an infection in the body.

Currently, only type 1 diabetes can be treated with insulin, with careful monitoring of blood glucose levels through blood testing monitors.

Basic treatment of type 1 diabetes, even though the earliest stages, is replacement of insulin. Without insulin, type 1 diabetics can experience can lead to coma and even death.

In a study involving 42 people with type 1 diabetes found that almost half have an immune system T-cells contained in the respondent's body to produce excessive reactions after eating food that contains wheat.

Excessive reaction can be itching, nausea, dizziness, and other symptoms common in people who are also allergic to wheat.

Someone who does not have penyalit allergic reaction will not result in excess when taking something. That's because the immune system in the body working in balance, but what happens in people allergic to the contrary.

"The body's immune system must find the balance to keep the body from foreign substances without injuring himself or causing excessive reaction, especially from foods that contain bacteria," said Dr. Scott Fraser of the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and professor of the University of Ottawa, as reported by HealthDay, Saturday (29/8/2009).

"This study shows that people with certain types of genes will have excess body's reaction to wheat and the possibility of some other food types," said Schott.

"And it could disrupt the balance in the body's immune system and trigger type 1 diabetes," he added.

Dr Mikael KNIP said that the existence of these facts could be evidence that the protein gluten found in wheat is to be active agents in the process a person becomes diabetic and should be avoided.

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