Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)



MRI provides a visual image of adipose tissue and non-fat tissue within the sections of the body scanned. The subject must lie enclosed in a scanner Hills/Lyell/Byrne 4 until sufficient images are obtained to predict total body fat. The weight of fat is then estimated using the known volume and density of fat. It must be noted that the non-fat components of fat (protein and water) will be included in areas of fat and thus the FFM estimate from this technique will be less
than that measured using DXA or hydrodensitometry. The benefits of MRI are the ability to measure regional fat distribution and inter-abdominal fat content, and the high degree of accuracy and reliability [18]. Several limitations exist, especially when working with children. The subject must be enclosed in the MRI scanner for a long period of time that may be traumatic, especially for younger children. The method is expensive, time consuming, not accessible to all practitioners and therefore has limited application for work with paediatric populations.

No comments:

Post a Comment